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Good Packaging And Marketing.

Food Packaging Branding- Important Point of Choice

Have you ever been to grocery with the intention of buying between packaged foods items between5 to 6, only to discover that you walked out of the store with full cart; that is point of choice? Point of choice is the situation that happens when a consumer or buyer take action. The step of moving from checking the product to the process of buying it point of choice. The main difference between public relations and advertising that are designed to generate public awareness about the product, and point of choice is that the latter is focused on immediate response towards a purchase.



Consumers make decisions at the point of choice, in which case the need to purchase is likely to be attributed to attractive packaging. Therefore, the viewing space at the checkout is considered by Premium point of sale. Showrooms are sought by manufacturers of food and beverages.

He has not added these additional items to the basket because he responds to an advert. It was added because something compelled him to take action while he was in the store. He is looking for something interesting for dinner or dessert. Or he just like looked liked the product the packaging look like at the moment. If you market products that are sold on shelf in a retail environment, packaging is an essential point of your choice. Ask yourself these questions:

Does the packaged product call for attention? Is there any difference between the product and the others on the shelf?

If somebody should pick it up, will the packaging engage the consumer, thereby compel him to buy? Doe the label has enough information for the consumer?

Are the graphic designs appealing and does it portray what the product is all about?

We choose with our eyes and our feelings. If it looks good, we hope the taste is good. If there is an ingenious and convincing story that shows that the product is local, the company is owned by farmers, or is there anything special about the recipe that gives us a reason to try more. The design of food packaging needs glamour, taste descriptors and a good story that will make it authentic.

Every consumer would want to know about the packaged products where it comes from, how they are made, who is behind the production? For these reasons the food must be tempting, unique, interesting and, of course, really delicious.

The Best Reasons To Start A Special Events Business

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The special events industry has grown enormously over the past decade. According to recent research conducted by Dr. Joe Goldblatt, CSEP (Certified Special Events Professional), spending for special events worldwide is $500 billion annually. Goldblatt is the founder of International Special Events Society (ISES), the founding director of the Event Management Program at George Washington University, and co-author of The International Dictionary of Event Management. "Suffice it to say, the marketplace is large enough to support and sustain your endeavor," says Goldblatt. "If you're working in one special events area, there are many directions in which you can expand. If you're just entering the profession of special events, there's a lucrative market awaiting you on many fronts."

What's Inside Introduction Target Market Startup Costs Operations Income and Billing Marketing and Resources More articles on event planning ยป According to Goldblatt's research, profits in this industry continue to rise. Just a few years ago, Goldblatt says, the average profit margin for an event planning entrepreneur was around 15 percent. His most recent studies, however, show profit margins can be as much as 40 percent. He attributes the industry's good health to several factors, including the improved economy and the trend of corporate America to outsource their meeting planning functions. What Is Event Planning? This question breaks down into two questions: What kinds of games are we talking about? And, what is event planning?

First things first. Generally speaking, special events occur for the following purposes:

Celebrations (fairs, parades, weddings, reunions, birthdays, anniversaries) Education (conferences, meetings, graduations) Promotions (product launches, political rallies, fashion shows) Commemorations (memorials, civic events) This list isn't an exhaustive one, but as the examples illustrate, individual events may be business related, purely social or somewhere in between.

Now we move to the second question: What is event planning? Planners of an event may handle any or all of the following tasks related to that event:

Conducting research Creating an event design Finding a site Arranging for food, decor, and entertainment Planning transportation to and from the event Sending invitations to attendees Arranging any necessary accommodations for attendees Coordinating the activities of event personnel Supervising at the site Conducting evaluations of the event How many of these activities your business engages in will depend on the size and type of a particular event, which will, in turn, rely on the specialization you choose.

Why Do People Hire Event Planners? This question has a simple answer: Individuals often find they lack the expertise and time to plan events themselves. Independent planners can step in and give these special events the attention they deserve.

Who Becomes An Event Planner? Planners are often people who got their start in one particular aspect of special events. Business owner Martin Van Keken had a successful catering company before he decided to plan entire events. Many other planners have similar stories. This explains why planners often not only coordinate full events but may, also, provide one or more services for those events.

Event planners may also have started out planning events for other companies before deciding to go into business for themselves. Joyce Barnes-Wolff planned in-house events for a retail chain for 11 years and then worked for another event planning company before striking out on her own.

Becoming Certified Consider getting a degree or certificate from a local university in event planning or management. A list of colleges and universities offering educational opportunities in this field is available from Meeting Professionals International (MPI).

Also, consider working to become a CSEP (Certified Special Events Professional) or CMP (Certified Meeting Planner). These designations are given out by ISES and MPI, respectively. Many corporations and some members of the general public look for these designations when hiring planners. Because of the research and study, it takes to become a CSEP or CMP; clients know that these planners are professionals.